Seating Arrangements 2

Seating Arrangements 2

The had table is placed in prominent position and usually includes the bride and groom and members of the bridal party. However, there are no hard fast rules and parents, ushers, flower girls or ring bearers could be part of the head table instead.

You could also have the bridesmaids and groomsmen sit with the guests sit with their parents at the head table.

Tables closest to the head table are reserved for immediate family, such as the parents of the bride and groom. Parents of the bride and groom can host their table with grandparents, siblings and honoured guests sitting at their table. Seat parents facing towards the head table. If you have divorced parents attending with new partners, some care needs to be taken. If they are on good terms, then you may like to have them on the same table as each other. Seat their parents with mutual friends on separate table nearby.

Otherwise. each of your parents can host their own separate table. The overriding concern in these sorts of arrangements in to make as many people as comfortable as you can, so always discuss your planned seating with each party first.

Please let your wedding photographer know which tables are the VIP guests such as your parents, so we can focus them more than other guests.

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Sydney Wedding Photography by Katsu

 

Seating Arrangements

Seating Arrangements

Allocated seating avoids guests clambering or fighting for the best seats while leaving total strangers with little in common forced to sit next to each other. Most weddings keep head table seating fairly close to traditional arrangements, but guest allocations are open to greater discretion and require thoughtful planning.

The final seating arrangement can be organised close to your wedding day when all your RSVPs have been returned.

To help make it easier to allocate seats, draw the outline of the number of tables and room set-up on a large piece of paper. Tables are usually round and seat eight or sometimes 10 to a table, but check this with your reception centre beforehand.

Write each guest’s name on a Post it note and place it on your layout where you would like each to sit. Once you have finalised your seating plan, clearly labelled seating allocation list should be posted to at the entrance to the reception venue.

Make sure you talk to your wedding photographer where you will be entering to the reception venue, so he / she will know what to capture. It’s always good to introduce your photographer to MC what will be happening on the night.

If you are planning to have your wedding this year 2013, please let me know early as my availability for this year has already filling up quickly.

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Sydney Wedding Photography by Katsu

 

 

The Caterer

The Caterer

Your reception centre usually handles both the catering and the beverages.
This makes life a little easier, but it also means you will need to take into account the standard of food when you select your reception centre.

Ask potential caterers to fax or post their menus and pricing structure to you; this will save you the initial running around. Food prices are usually based on a cost per person basis. Check to see if this covers staff, silverware and linens. Make sure you get everything in writing. Take note of the cancelation policy and guarantee of food quality and service.

Menu selection will depend upon your own tastes, guest numbers, budget, time of year time you want to ear and formality of the reception.

Foe example, mains can be served as a sit down meal or as a buffet. Sit-down menus are regarded as a more formal wedding occasion. Smaller, less formal weddings may only have finger food or fruit and cheese platter.

The wedding cake can be served as the dessert.  Remember that you do’t want to serve too little food. Order the right amount for the occation. Your caterer may be able to help with the table settings and design, and assist with hiring any other need equipment such as chairs and tables.

If you need more advise about the caterer, please ask me as I have photographed so many weddings in the past.

Hope this article was helpful.

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wedding photography by Katsu

 

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Beverages part two

Beverages part two

Whatever bar arrangements you decide on, ensure there is a variety of alcoholic and non-alcoholic drinks. A sensible beverage list could include two choices of beer (light and full length) red and white wine, water, soft drinks, orange juice and sparkling wine for toasting. There are also a number of simple cost-saving measures you can adopt:

  • Place a time limit on the bar opening hours. Pre-dinner drinks are usually served 30-60minutes before dinner and finish at 12midnight. Guests pay for their own drinks outside these times.
  • To lower consumption, and thereby reduce costs, have wait staff serve the drinks coming around on trays.
  • If you would like to have a toast with traditional sparkling wine, chepaish one should do, since guests will only sipping it.
  • Select venue that allows BYO alcohol. Negotiate a reduced price with your local liquor store to supply kegs of beer and cases of wine.
  • Ask your reception co-ordinator for other ways of reducing the bill.

Question to ask the beverage supplier

  • Is a deposit required?
  • Wat methods of payment are accepted?
  • Do they provide an agreement in writing?
  • What will the wait people be wearing?
  • Who pays for damaged or broken glasses?
  • How will the drinks be served? For example, at the bar or do they serve?
  • Who will be in charge on the day?

Don’t forget  your photographer will be taking photos through the night at the reception. You probably do not want to get drunk bad… 🙂

Hope this article was helpful.

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wedding reception

Beverages

Beverages

Celebrity drinks are a typical part of a wedding reception. Because they add significantly to the costs, carefully calculate what financial contribution you can afford.
Following are different arrangements you can make for the bar service.

Cash Only Bar:
A cash only bar requires guests to pay for the drinks themselves, which maybe necessary, depending on your budget. However, depending on the formality of the event, guests generally expect at least some of the drinks to be paid for.

Paying on consumption:
Paying on consumption means you pay what the guests drink. But there is flexibility in how this can be arranged.

  • An open bar is where you pay for all the drinks, and this invalids spirits and cocktails. This can be a costly option.
  • A wine and beer bar is where you can limit what you pay for to drinks such as beer, wine and soft drinks.
  • A set price bar is an agreed up-front prince per guest, irrespective of the amount actually consumed

If you are looking for more information about wedding reception,  I am happy to give you some advice based on my experiences in the wedding industry.

Hope this article was helpful.

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Sydney Wedding Photography by Katsu

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